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Magic and religion in medieval England Preview this item
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Magic and religion in medieval England

Author: Catherine Rider
Publisher: London : Reaktion Books, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
During the Middle Ages, many occult rituals and beliefs existed and were practiced alongside those officially sanctioned by the church. While educated clergy condemned some of these as magic, many of these practices involved religious language, rituals, or objects. For instance, charms recited to cure illnesses invoked God and the saints, and love spells used consecrated substances such as the Eucharist. Magic and  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Church history
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Catherine Rider
ISBN: 9781780230351 1780230354
OCLC Number: 788271907
Description: 219 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction --
Predicting the future and healing the sick : magic, science and the natural world --
Charms, prayers and prophecies : magic and religion --
Flying women, fairies and demons --
Harm and protection --
Channelling the stars and summoning demons : magical texts --
Arguing against magic --
Action against magic --
Religion and magic : medieval England and beyond.
Responsibility: Catherine Rider.

Abstract:

Unearths evidence and new information concerning the widespread use of magical practices and the clergy's response. This book traces the change in the Church's attitude to vernacular forms of magic  Read more...
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"Rider . . . evinces a pastoral appreciation of the human condition with its manifold worries while maintaining the medieval distinctions between fold customs, religion, and magic. Highly Read more...

 
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